How a Bitter Election Will End

American political campaigns are often strident, vitriolic and hateful affairs. They exploit our divisions and intensify our disagreements. They force us to listen to all sorts of allegations that insult our intelligence, week after week, chasing us wherever we might flee. They reflect, and fuel, a polarization that sometimes looks fatal.

But Americans rarely resort to violence, unless you count vandalizing yard signs. Our campaigns eventually end, and when they do, a few people cry foul or demand recounts. But the vast majority accepts the result and gets back to other business.

How a Bitter Election Will End

.

.

What does President Obama’s victory mean?

My response:

Obama’s victory means, for now at least, that the politics of personal destruction and division by identity (“Voting is the best revenge”) has carried the day with a thin majority of the electorate, who seem to believe that the laws of economics, which Obama has never understood, can be reversed. They think that in Greece too, and march in the streets accordingly, as if that could reverse those laws.

In his victory speech last night Obama said that “this country only works when we accept certain obligations to one another and to future generations.” Future generations? This from the man who has overseen a $5 trillion increase in the debt that falls on those future generations?

The Politics of Hope — and Denial

.

In any case, sounds like as good a day as any to drink, right? I mean, it’s been a long long LONG few years, but now it’s finally over. We can finally … whine and moan about the direction the country is heading. But regardless of who wins, let’s just all be glad of one thing: At least John Edwards never got into the White House. Holy SHIT that was a close one.

Happy Halo 4 Release Day!